Savage Appetites: Four True Stories of Women, Crime, and Obsession by Rachel Monroe

44463274._SY475_In the 1940s, a bored heiress began creating dollhouse crime scenes depicting murders, suicides, and accidental deaths.  In the aftermath of the Manson Family murders, a young woman moved into Sharon Tate’s guesthouse and entwined herself with the Tate family. In the mid-nineties, a landscape architect in Brooklyn fell in love with a convicted murderer through an intense series of letters. And in 2015, a teenager deeply involved in the online fandom for the Columbine killers planned a mass shooting of her own.

Each woman, Monroe argues, represents and identifies with a particular archetype that provides an entryway into true crime. Through these four cases, she traces the history of American crime through the growth of forensic science, the evolving role of victims, the Satanic Panic, the rise of online detectives, and the long shadow of the Columbine shooting.

Review:

This was my last read for the opening round of the Booktube Prize and it followed No Visible Bruises, a harrowing look at domestic violence. It feels weird to say, but the tone of this book was downright breezy in comparison.

It’s not a knock on the book. Monroe introduces us to women who identify with one of four archetypal roles – the killer, the victim, the attorney, and the detective. Tales from the author’s life, such as her stint volunteering at a law office and attending a true crime convention, are scattered throughout.

Overall I found the book was scattershot, examining bits and pieces without coalescing around a central narrative. I remember lovely lines and thoughts, but it failed to hold together as a whole for me. Not a bad read by any means – I both learned things and enjoyed myself – but it didn’t quite stack up to some of the other books this round.