Melmoth by Sarah Perry

36628420It has been years since Helen Franklin left England. In Prague, working as a translator, she has found a home of sorts—or, at least, refuge. That changes when her friend Karel discovers a mysterious letter in the library, a strange confession and a curious warning that speaks of Melmoth the Witness, a dark legend found in obscure fairy tales and antique village lore. As such superstition has it, Melmoth travels through the ages, dooming those she persuades to join her to a damnation of timeless, itinerant solitude. To Helen it all seems the stuff of unenlightened fantasy.

But, unaware, as she wanders the cobblestone streets Helen is being watched. And then Karel disappears. . . .

Review:

Content warning for war atrocities.

After a run of decidedly meh books for The Booktube Prize the beginning of this book excited me – a mystery, yea! It morphed a bit as it went on, from mystery to Gothic horror-ish to historical fiction. And I can’t say I like the work as a whole.

I don’t want to spoil anything so I’m going to be (annoyingly?) vague. The central narrative follows Helen but flashes back to several different times and places through the use of “primary” documents. Normally I love this sort of thing, and some of the tales stood out as fine short stories in their own right, but it didn’t feel cohesive. The reader is tipped into and out of story lines with the grace of someone emptying a wheelbarrow.

While the writing doesn’t bother me the literary devices do. Symbolism isn’t merely used, it’s beat over our heads until I rolled my eyes at every mention of a jackdaw. In the middle a connection is made between the atrocities of the past and those of today. It could have been an, ‘oh, wow’ kind of revelation, but it’s done in a ham-handed way that strips it of any power. And the “twist” at the end is meant to give goosebumps but only made me yawn.

All in all it was disappointing for my first Sarah Perry.

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One thought on “Melmoth by Sarah Perry

  1. Haha, symbolism in books isn’t ever my thing, but I do hate when an author over does it. I’m sorry to hear this wasn’t more enjoyable, but I did enjoy your review!

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